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The Agile Uprising Podcast

This is the Agile Uprising Podcast. Agile Uprising is a purpose-built network that focuses on the advancement of the agile mindset and global professional networking between leading agilists. We will remain agnostic of certifying bodies and focus purely on the advancement of the agile craft. Our network will evolve over time, and at the core our online community will remain free to join - forever. We will leverage both traditional and emerging communication and collaboration channels to explore various topics of interest with a direct focus on removing external influences from sponsors, partners and other organizations. Subscribe to our podcast on iTunes, Stitcher or your favorite podcasting app!
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Agile Uprising is a purpose-built network that focuses on the advancement of the agile mindset and global professional networking between and among practicing agilists.

 

This is a group founded by passionate practitioners for passionate practitioners, and not a revenue generating organization.

We will remain agnostic of certifying bodies, removing external influences such as sponsors, partners and other organizations allowing us to focus purely on the advancement of the agile craft.

Visit our Main Page | Join the Coalition | View our Manifesto Author Project

May 7, 2017

In this live episode, recorded on location at the Agile and Beyond conference this week, our all-star cast tackles the topic of Imposter Syndrome:

Impostor syndrome (also known as impostor phenomenon or fraud syndrome) is a concept describing high-achieving individuals who are marked by an inability to internalize their accomplishments and a persistent fear of being exposed as a "fraud". The term was coined in 1978 by clinical psychologists Pauline R. Clance and Suzanne A. Imes. Despite external evidence of their competence, those exhibiting the syndrome remain convinced that they are frauds and do not deserve the success they have achieved. Proof of success is dismissed as luck, timing, or as a result of deceiving others into thinking they are more intelligent and competent than they believe themselves to be. Some studies suggest that impostor syndrome is particularly common among high-achieving women.

~ source: wikipedia

Join our guests listed below, as they have a very honest and vulnerable discussion about the reality of imposter syndrome, and how it effects them. Also, how they view imposter syndrome negatively effecting the agile community at large.

Pradeepa Narayanaswamy

Billie Schutterpelz

 

Allison Pollard

Chris Murman

(Newest Agile Uprising Board Member)

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